To Honour Canada's Military


Canadian Forces CF (Canadian Forces)


The Canadian Forces have derived many of their traditions and symbols from the military, navy and air force of the United Kingdom, including those with royal elements. Contemporary icons and rituals, however, have evolved to include elements reflective of Canada and the Canadian monarchy.
United Nations Command (UNC) United Nations Command (UNC)


Peacekeepers monitor and observe peace processes in post-conflict areas and assist ex-combatants in implementing the peace agreements they may have signed. Such assistance comes in many forms, including confidence-building measures, power-sharing arrangements, electoral support, strengthening the rule of law, and economic and social development. Accordingly, UN peacekeepers (often referred to as Blue Berets or Blue Helmets because of their light blue berets or helmets) can include soldiers, police officers, and civilian personnel.
Canadian Airborne Regiment Canadian Airborne Regiment


The main proponent of the Airborne was General Jean Victor Allard who, as commander of the Army (i.e. Mobile Command) and then Chief of Defence Staff, created it between 1965 and 1968 as a large rapid-reaction, light mobile force, suitable for overseas brigade-size missions. It was designed as a flexible short-term immediate response available to the government when it accepted an overseas reinforcement or intervention mission within NATO, or elsewhere.

Battle Honours
Cpl Smith Scott Fraser
Rank: Corporal Cpl
Service Number: B68867034
Born: May 05, 1971 Dunnville, Ontario
Discharged: Killed In Action

Served In: Peacekeeping
Service: CF (Canadian Forces)
Battle Group: United Nations Command (UNC)
Regiment: Canadian Airborne Regiment
Dag Hammarskjöld Dag Hammarskjöld
The Dag Hammarskjöld Medal is a posthumous award given by the United Nations (UN) to military personnel, police, or civilians who lose their lives while serving in a United Nations peacekeeping operation. The medal is named after Dag Hammarskjöld, the second Secretary-General of the United Nations, who died in a plane crash in what is now Zambia in September 1961.
Service Details :


Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
The prestigious Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to all United Nations Peacekeepers in 1988 in recognition of their collective efforts in the cause of peace. This inspired the creation of the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM) to acknowledge the unique contribution to peace that Canadian peacekeepers have made since 1947.
UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM)
UNOSOM was established on 24 April 1992. In accordance with the agreements reached with the two main Somali factions in Mogadishu, the cease-fire in the capital was to be monitored by a group of 50 unarmed, uniformed United Nations military observers. The observers were to be deployed along the demarcation line separating Mogadishu into two zones. As regards humanitarian assistance, the security personnel envisaged in the agreements were to provide protection and security for United Nations personnel, equipment and supplies at the port of Mogadishu and escort deliveries of humanitarian supplies from there to distribution centres in the city and its immediate environs. They were also to provide security for United Nations personnel, equipment and supplies at the airport in Mogadishu. They were to provide the United Nations’ convoys of relief supplies with a sufficiently strong military escort to deter attack; they were authorized to fire in self-defence as a last resort if deterrence should not prove effective. On 28 August, the Security Council, authorized an increase in strength of UNOSOM by four additional UN security units, for the protection of the humanitarian convoys and distribution centres throughout Somalia. Several of the Somali de facto authorities refused to agree to the deployment of United Nations troops and only one battalion and military observers were deployed to Mogadishu. Relief ships were blocked from docking and even shelled. Air and seaports came under fire resulting in the non-delivery of relief supplies to areas where the need was most acute. On 3 December 1992, the Security Council authorized the use of all necessary means to establish, as soon as possible, a secure environment for humanitarian and relief operations in Somalia. The first elements of the Unified Task Force, spearheaded by the United States of America, were deployed in Mogadishu on 9 December 1992. UNOSOM ended on the 30 April 1993.
Awarded for 90 days service from 24 April 1992 to 30 April 1993.
UN Assistance Mission For Rwanda (UNAMIR)
This mission was established 5 October 1993 to the monitor cease-fire, security situation, process of repatriation of refugees, to assist with mine clearance, the coordination of humanitarian assistance and to contribute to the security of the city of Kigali. UNAMIR also contributed to the security of personnel of the International Tribunal for Rwanda and of human rights offices in Rwanda and assisted in the establishment and training of a now, integrated national police force. The UNAMIR mandate came to end in March 1996.
Awarded for 90 days consecutive service between 5 October 1993 to 31 March 1996.

Service Notes: By October 1994, estimates suggested that out of a population of 7.9 million, at least half a million people had been killed. Some 2 million had fled to other countries and as many as 2 million people were internally displaced. A United Nations humanitarian appeal launched in July raised $762 million, making it possible to respond to the enormous humanitarian challenge. A Commission of Experts established by the Security Council reported in September that "overwhelming evidence" proved that Hutu elements had perpetrated acts of genocide against the Tutsi group in a "concerted, planned, systematic and methodical way." The final report of the Commission was presented to the Council in December 1994. In the following months, UNAMIR continued its efforts to ensure security and stability, support humanitarian assistance, clear landmines and help refugees to resettle. But Rwanda supported ending the mission, stating that UNAMIR did not respond to its priority needs. The Security Council heeded that request, and UNAMIR left in March 1996.
Enlisted: July 6, 1989
Pre/Post War:

Deceased: December 25, 1994 at Kigali, Rwanda
Cemetery Dunnville (Woodlawn) Cemetery ,
Obituary: Son of Wayne and Valerie Smith.
 
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Cpl Scott Fraser Smith on other official websites
Canadian Virtual
War Memorial

Researched By: Sean Wilson

Cpl Scott Fraser Smith
Printable Version
Medals and Commendations
(In Order):

Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM)
UN Assistance Mission For Rwanda (UNAMIR)

Page 197 from 7th
Book of Remembrance

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