To Honour Canada's Military


Canadian Forces CF (Canadian Forces)


The Canadian Forces have derived many of their traditions and symbols from the military, navy and air force of the United Kingdom, including those with royal elements. Contemporary icons and rituals, however, have evolved to include elements reflective of Canada and the Canadian monarchy.
United Nations Command (UNC) United Nations Command (UNC)


Peacekeepers monitor and observe peace processes in post-conflict areas and assist ex-combatants in implementing the peace agreements they may have signed. Such assistance comes in many forms, including confidence-building measures, power-sharing arrangements, electoral support, strengthening the rule of law, and economic and social development. Accordingly, UN peacekeepers (often referred to as Blue Berets or Blue Helmets because of their light blue berets or helmets) can include soldiers, police officers, and civilian personnel.
442 Transport and Rescue Squadron 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron
Motto: One God, One Queen, One Heart

442 Transport and Rescue Squadron is a Royal Canadian Air Force tactical transport and search and rescue unit based at Canadian Forces Base (CFB) Comox in the Canadian province of British Columbia. The squadron flies six De Havilland Canada CC-115 Buffalo STOL aircraft and five AgustaWestland CH-149 Cormorant rescue helicopters. One of each is on constant readiness to deploy in response to distress calls in the Victoria Search and Rescue Region, which includes most of British Columbia and the territory of Yukon as well as 560,000 square kilometres in the Pacific Ocean, up to 600 nm offshore. The squadron also serves as the Operational Training Unit for the Cormorant helicopter.

Battle Honours
Cpl Stringer Bruce Kenneth
Rank: Corporal Cpl
Service Number:
Born: Sep 24, 1950 Kitchener, Ontario
Discharged: Killed In Action

Served In: Peacekeeping
Service: CF (Canadian Forces)
Battle Group: United Nations Command (UNC)
Regiment: 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron
Dag Hammarskjöld Dag Hammarskjöld
The Dag Hammarskjöld Medal is a posthumous award given by the United Nations (UN) to military personnel, police, or civilians who lose their lives while serving in a United Nations peacekeeping operation. The medal is named after Dag Hammarskjöld, the second Secretary-General of the United Nations, who died in a plane crash in what is now Zambia in September 1961.
Service Details :
External Links
BUFFALO 461 - Last Flight


Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
The prestigious Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to all United Nations Peacekeepers in 1988 in recognition of their collective efforts in the cause of peace. This inspired the creation of the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM) to acknowledge the unique contribution to peace that Canadian peacekeepers have made since 1947.
UN Emergency Force (UNEF)
Through the efforts of Canada's External Affairs Minister, Lester B. Pearson, the UN General Assembly agreed to its first peacekeeping force to secure peace in the region (previous operations had been only observer forces). Under the command of a Canadian, MGen Eedson Louis Millard BURNS, (OC) DSO OBE MC, the UNEF, on 07 November 1956, was given a mandate to secure the removal of Israeli, British and French troops from the Suez canal zone and the Gaza Strip and to maintain peace in the area. The first Canadian troops arrived in Egypt on 24 November 1956, and Egypt abruptly asked them to leave in May 1967, leading to the six-day war between Israel and Egypt. Thirty-two Canadians lost their lives serving with this force.
Awarded for 90 days consecutive service between 07 November 1956 to 17 June 1967.

Service Notes: Tragically on August 9, 1974. Buffalo aircraft number 115461, on a routine flight to Damascus, had left Beirut and climbed eastward over the Lebanese highlands. It was being painted by Syrian radar, and as it neared the village of Diemas, someone in the SAM site there decided to "Terminate" its progress. Several SAMs were launched, at least one being on target. The Buffalo, commanded by Capt Gary Foster, was blown out of the sky. Nine Canadians lost their lives in this bizarre incident. Though it was investigated by the UN, CF and Syrians, no satisfactory public explaination of the tragedy was released.
Enlisted: December 12, 1968
Pre/Post War:

Deceased: August 09, 1974 at Damascus, Syrian Arab Republic
Cemetery ANGUS UNION Cemetery Angus, Ontario, Canada
Marker: Plot 11, Row L
Obituary: Husband of Shirley Ann (nee Ross) Stringer of Consecon, Ontario.
 
The medals and information on this page have not been verified by Family, Friends or historical document. To help us make this page more accurate and complete please email info@RememberNovember11.com to request any changes or to help us verify any medals or commendations.
Cpl Bruce Kenneth Stringer on other official websites
Canadian Virtual
War Memorial

Researched By: Sean Wilson

Cpl Bruce Kenneth Stringer
Printable Version
Medals and Commendations
(In Order):

Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
UN Emergency Force (UNEF)

Page 159 from 7th
Book of Remembrance

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