To Honour Canada's Military


Canadian Army CA (Canadian Army)
Motto: We Stand on Guard for Thee

The First Canadian Army was a field army and the senior formation of the Canadian Army that served on the Western Front from July 1944 until May 1945 during the Second World War. The First Canadian Army was formed in early 1942, replacing the existing unnumbered Canadian Corps, as the growing number of Canadian forces in the United Kingdom necessitated an expansion to two corps. By the end of 1943 Canadian formations in the United Kingdom consisted of three infantry divisions, two armoured divisions, and two independent armoured brigades. The first commander was Lieutenant-General A.G.L. "Andy" McNaughton, who was replaced in 1944 by General H. D. G. "Harry" Crerar. Both had been senior artillery officers in the Canadian Corps in the Great War. Allied formations of other nationalities were added to the First Canadian Army to keep it at full strength
United Nations Command (UNC) United Nations Command (UNC)


Peacekeepers monitor and observe peace processes in post-conflict areas and assist ex-combatants in implementing the peace agreements they may have signed. Such assistance comes in many forms, including confidence-building measures, power-sharing arrangements, electoral support, strengthening the rule of law, and economic and social development. Accordingly, UN peacekeepers (often referred to as Blue Berets or Blue Helmets because of their light blue berets or helmets) can include soldiers, police officers, and civilian personnel.
Canadian Intelligence Corps Canadian Intelligence Corps


Once the Canadian Army was “firmly established in France,” its Intelligence Corps personnel made good use of “the principles they had learned in England, North Africa, Sicily and Italy.” They achieved effective results “during the Canadian Army’s drive through Belgium and South Holland in December 1944,” and on into Germany in 1945. As the Allied armies advanced eastward through France, groups of “stay-behind” enemy agents were rapidly ferreted out from their places of concealment and, if of French nationality, turned over to the French for examination and trial. Caches of explosives that had been prepared and stored or set in place to destroy key points, facilities, infrastructure, personnel, and equipment, were retrieved from underground storage vaults and rendered harmless. So effective were these efforts, that instances of sabotage were few and isolated. Other branches of Intelligence were similarly active. “Captured enemy personnel and material were subjected to” a “thorough search, examination” and Interrogation in order to provide a current data base that would “keep pace with the ever changing enemy order of battle and improvements in weapons and equipment.” German radio messages were intercepted and decoded. The Intelligence gleaned by C Int C staffs enabled them to gain an accurate indication of changes in the identity of enemy formations facing them. These indications were supported by all available sources and agencies, including debriefing reports provided “from Canadian reconnaissance patrols, tactical air reconnaissance pilots, air photographs, as well as captured documents” and enemy equipment (CED & CEE). (No. 2 Canadian Special Wireless (SW) Section for example, operated from a Bedford truck under Major R.S. Grant as it fought its way towards and into Germany). All collected information was carefully processed and examined for useful information and then disseminated to the decision makers for further direction using the “Intelligence Cycle“ process.

Battle Honours
Lt Edmonds Kenneth Ernest
Rank: Lieutenant
Lt
Service Number: ZK-9445
Born: Aug 30, 1920 Chilliwack, British Columbia
Discharged: Deceased

Served In: Peacekeeping
Service: CA (Canadian Army)
Battle Group: United Nations Command (UNC)
Regiment: Canadian Intelligence Corps
General Service General Service Badge WW2
Awarded to members of the Navy, Army or Air Forces of Canada who have declared their willingness, or who have engaged to serve in any of the said forces on active service during the Second World War.
Dag Hammarskjöld Dag Hammarskjöld
The Dag Hammarskjöld Medal is a posthumous award given by the United Nations (UN) to military personnel, police, or civilians who lose their lives while serving in a United Nations peacekeeping operation. The medal is named after Dag Hammarskjöld, the second Secretary-General of the United Nations, who died in a plane crash in what is now Zambia in September 1961.
Service Details :
External Links
lermuseum.org

1939-45 Star
The Star was awarded for six months service on active operations for Army and Navy, and two months for active air-crew between 02 September 1939 and 08 May 1945 (Europe) or 02 September 1945 (Pacific).
Italy Star
The star was awarded for one day operational service in Sicily or Italy between 11 June 1943 and 08 May 1945.
France And Germany Star
The Star was awarded for one day or more of service in France, Belgium, Holland or Germany between 06 June 1944 (D-Day) and 08 May 1945.
Defence Medal
Although the medal was usually awarded to Canadians for six months service in Britain between 03 September 1939 and 08 May 1945, the exact terms were: Service in the forces in non-operational areas subjected to air attack or closely threatened, providing such service lasted for three or more years. Service overseas or outside the country of residence, providing that such service lasted for one year, except in territories threatened by the enemy or subject to bomb attacks, in which case it was six months prior to 02 September 1945. Under the terms of this last condition, Canadians serving for one year in Newfoundland were eligible and persons serving for six months in Hong Kong were also eligible. The qualifying period in mine and bomb disposal was three months. Canadians serving in West Africa, Palestine and India, other than operational air crew, qualified for this medal. Those awarded the GC or GM for civil defence received this medal. Home Guard and others in Britain qualified for this medal.
Canadian Volunteer Service Medal
The Canadian Volunteer Service Medal is granted to persons of any rank in the Naval, Military or Air Forces of Canada who voluntarily served on Active Service and have honourably completed eighteen months (540 days) total voluntary service from September 3, 1939 to March 1, 1947.
War Medal (1939-45)
The War Medal was awarded to all full-time personnel of the armed forces and merchant marines for serving for 28 days between 03 September 1939 and 02 September 1945. In the Merchant Navy, the 28 days must have been served at sea.
Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
The prestigious Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to all United Nations Peacekeepers in 1988 in recognition of their collective efforts in the cause of peace. This inspired the creation of the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM) to acknowledge the unique contribution to peace that Canadian peacekeepers have made since 1947.

UN Forces in Cyprus (UNIFICYP)
In the interest of international peace and security, the Mission was established in March 1964 to use its best efforts to prevent the recurrence of fighting between the Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots and, as necessary, to contribute to the maintenance and restoration of law and order and a return to normal conditions. Since the hostilities of 1974, the mandate has included supervising the cease-fire and maintaining a buffer zone between the lines of the Cyprus National Guard and of the Turkish and Turkish Cypriot forces.
Awarded for 30 days service between 27 March 1964 and 27 March 1965, but 90 days consecutive service is required after 27 March 1965 to the present.

Service Notes:
Enlisted: September 4, 1939 Calgary, Alberta
Pre/Post War:

Deceased: December 25, 1964 at Cyprus
Cemetery DHEKELIA GARRISON British Military Cemetery Larnaca, Cyprus
Marker: Grave 17, Row A, Plot 3
Obituary: Son of Mr. Ernest James and Mrs. Florence May Edmonds of Chilliwack, British Columbia. Husband of Mrs. Caroline Edmonds of London, Ontario.
 
The medals and information on this page have not been verified by Family, Friends or historical document. To help us make this page more accurate and complete please email info@RememberNovember11.com to request any changes or to help us verify any medals or commendations.
Lt Kenneth Ernest Edmonds on other official websites
Canadian Virtual
War Memorial

Researched By: Sean Wilson

Lt Kenneth Ernest Edmonds
Printable Version
Medals and Commendations
(In Order):

1939-45 Star
Italy Star
France And Germany Star
Defence Medal
Canadian Volunteer Service Medal
War Medal (1939-45)
Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
UN Forces in Cyprus (UNIFICYP)

Page 122 from 7th
Book of Remembrance

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