To Honour Canada's Military


Canadian Forces CF (Canadian Forces)


The Canadian Forces have derived many of their traditions and symbols from the military, navy and air force of the United Kingdom, including those with royal elements. Contemporary icons and rituals, however, have evolved to include elements reflective of Canada and the Canadian monarchy.
ISAF (International Security Assistance Force) ISAF (International Security Assistance Force)
Motto: Assistance and Cooperation

The International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) was a NATO-led security mission in Afghanistan, established by the United Nations Security Council in December 2001 by Resolution 1386, as envisaged by the Bonn Agreement. Its main purpose was to train the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) and assist Afghanistan in rebuilding key government institutions, but was also engaged in the 2001–present war with the Taliban insurgency.
Royal 22e Régiment Royal 22e Régiment


The 3rd Battalion, along with an attached mechanized company from the 1st, provided the basis for the Canadian ISAF contingent in Kabul, Afghanistan, from February to August 2004.

In August 2007 a battle group based on the 3rd Battalion of the Royal 22nd Regiment returned to Afghanistan, replacing the 2nd Battalion The Royal Canadian Regiment in Kandahar province. The battle group was made up of a company from each of the regiment's three regular battalions. It also included combat support and service support from all the units of 5 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Valcartier, Quebec. There was a reconnaissance squadron from the 12e Régiment blindé du Canada, a composite tank squadron from Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) (with troops from the other two armoured regiments), a battery from the 5th Regiment light artillery du Canada, an engineer squadron from 5 Combat Engineer Regiment. The battle group, awarded the Commander-in-Chief Unit Commendation, was "instrumental in dismantling improvised explosive device networks, re-capturing checkpoints and returning them to Afghan control, enhancing the capacity of Afghan forces and providing guidance on community building and local governance".

Battle Honours
Afghanistan
WO Massouh CD Hani
Rank: Warrant Officer WO
Service Number: R71 806 778
Born: Nov 06, 1966 Alexandria, Egypt
Discharged: Deceased

Served In: Afghanistan
Service: CF (Canadian Forces)
Battle Group: ISAF (International Security Assistance Force)
Regiment: Royal 22e Régiment
Service Details :
WO Massouh had over 17 years service with the Canadian Forces and had previously been deployed to Haiti, Croatia, Somalia and Bosnia and Herzegovina in the former Yugoslavia.
External Links
canada.com

Sacrifice Medal (SM)
The Sacrifice Medal was created in the context of increased casualties in overseas operations to fulfill the desire of Canadians and the Government to provide formal recognition, through the award of an official medal emanating from the Crown, to those who die as a result of military service or are wounded by hostile action. This honour replaces the Wound Stripe
The Medal may be awarded to members of the Canadian Forces, members of an allied force working as an integral part of the Canadian Forces such as exchange personnel, civilian employees of the Government of Canada or Canadian citizens under contract with the Government of Canada, on the condition that they were deployed as part of a military mission under the authority of the Canadian Forces, that have, on or after October 7, 2001, died or been wounded under honourable circumstances as a direct result of hostile action on the condition that the wounds that were sustained required treatment by a physician and the treatment has been documented.
The Medal may also be awarded posthumously to any member of the Canadian Forces who served on or after 7 October 2001 in the Regular Force, Primary Reserve, Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service or Canadian Rangers, or any member of the Supplementary Reserve who served in or with one of the components aforementioned on or after 7 October 2001, and dies under honourable circumstances as a result of an injury or disease related to military service.
When a death is obviously related to service, the SM will be issued immediately. When the cause of death is not clear, the SM will only be issued once Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) has officially determined that the death was related to military service, in such a case, delays are to be expected before the SM can be awarded.
General Campaign Star – SOUTH-WEST ASIA (GCS-SWA)
This general service award has been created as a means to recognize - in a timelier manner - those who serve in operations in the presence of an armed enemy. Rather than creating a new honour for each new Canadian Forces operation as it arises, the General Campaign Star and General Service Medal - with their theatre or service specific ribbons - can be awarded in future to honour participation in any operation that meets the criteria. The General Campaign Star (GCS) is awarded to members of the Canadian Forces and members of allied forces working with the Canadian Forces who deploy into a defined theatre of operations to take part in operations in the presence of an armed enemy.
The GCS is always issued with a ribbon specific to the theatre or type of service being recognized, and each ribbon has its own criteria.
The GCS with South-West Asia ribbon is awarded to Canadian Forces members and members of allied forces working with the Canadian Forces who served either:
with the Canadian contribution to the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) in Afghanistan for at least 30 days cumulative between 24 April 2003 and 31 July 2009, in the theatre of operations which consisted of the political boundaries and airspace of Afghanistan; and/or in the theatre of operations consisting of the political boundaries of Afghanistan, the Persian Gulf, the Gulf of Oman, the Gulf of Aden, the Red Sea, the Suez Canal and those parts of the Indian Ocean and the Arabian Sea that are west of sixty-eight degrees East longitude and north of five degrees South latitude, as well as the airspace above those areas for at least 30 cumulative days commencing on August 1, 2009, provided that the service has not been recognized by another service medal.
Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
The prestigious Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to all United Nations Peacekeepers in 1988 in recognition of their collective efforts in the cause of peace. This inspired the creation of the Canadian Peacekeeping Service Medal (CPSM) to acknowledge the unique contribution to peace that Canadian peacekeepers have made since 1947.
UN Protection Force (Yugoslavia) (UNPROFOR)
UNPROFOR was established in February 1992 as an interim arrangement to create the conditions of peace and security required for the negotiation of an overall settlement of the Yugoslavian crisis. The role of the UN troops was to ensure that areas designated as "UN Protected Areas" (UNPA) became and remained demilitarized and that all persons residing in these areas were protected from fear of armed attack. The role of UN police monitors was to ensure that local police forces carried out their duties without discriminating against persons of any nationality or abusing any human rights. The force also assisted the humanitarian agencies of the UN in the return of all displaced persons who so desired.

There were several extensions of the original UNPROFOR covering the following purposes: reopening of the Sarajevo airport for humanitarian purposes; establishing a security zone encompassing Sarajevo and its airport; protection of convoys of released detainees in Bosnia and Herzegovina as requested by the International Committee of the Red Cross; monitoring arrangements for the complete withdrawal of the Yugoslavian Army from Croatia; the demilitarization of the Prevlaka peninsula and the removal of heavy weapons from neighbouring areas of Croatia and Montenegro (Res 779,1992); monitoring compliance with the ban on military flights (Res 781,1992); and the establishment of the United Nations presence in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.
UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM)
UNOSOM was established on 24 April 1992. In accordance with the agreements reached with the two main Somali factions in Mogadishu, the cease-fire in the capital was to be monitored by a group of 50 unarmed, uniformed United Nations military observers. The observers were to be deployed along the demarcation line separating Mogadishu into two zones. As regards humanitarian assistance, the security personnel envisaged in the agreements were to provide protection and security for United Nations personnel, equipment and supplies at the port of Mogadishu and escort deliveries of humanitarian supplies from there to distribution centres in the city and its immediate environs. They were also to provide security for United Nations personnel, equipment and supplies at the airport in Mogadishu. They were to provide the United Nations’ convoys of relief supplies with a sufficiently strong military escort to deter attack; they were authorized to fire in self-defence as a last resort if deterrence should not prove effective. On 28 August, the Security Council, authorized an increase in strength of UNOSOM by four additional UN security units, for the protection of the humanitarian convoys and distribution centres throughout Somalia. Several of the Somali de facto authorities refused to agree to the deployment of United Nations troops and only one battalion and military observers were deployed to Mogadishu. Relief ships were blocked from docking and even shelled. Air and seaports came under fire resulting in the non-delivery of relief supplies to areas where the need was most acute. On 3 December 1992, the Security Council authorized the use of all necessary means to establish, as soon as possible, a secure environment for humanitarian and relief operations in Somalia. The first elements of the Unified Task Force, spearheaded by the United States of America, were deployed in Mogadishu on 9 December 1992. UNOSOM ended on the 30 April 1993.
Awarded for 90 days service from 24 April 1992 to 30 April 1993.
UN Mission in Haiti (UNMIH)
This mission established to help implement certain provisions of the Governors Island Agreement signed by the Haitian parties on 3 July 1993. In 1993, UNMIH’s mandate was to assist in modernizing the armed forces of Haiti and establishing a new police force. That mandate could not be carried out due to the non-cooperation of the Haitian military authorities. On the 31 July 1994 the UN approved the establishment of an advance team of UNMIH to institute the appropriate means of coordination with the multinational force, to carry out the monitoring of the operations of the force, to assess requirements and to prepare for the deployment of UNMIH upon completion of the mission of the multinational force. The Mission terminated in June 1996.

UNMIH was succeeded in July 1996 by the United Nations Support Mission in Haiti (UNSMIH). Its mandate expired on 31 July 1997. The Security Council established the United Nations Support Mission in Haiti (UNSMIH) 28 June 1996. In setting up UNSMIH, the Council underlined the need to support the commitment of the Government of Haiti to maintain the secure and stable environment established by the Multinational Force in Haiti.

UNTMIH was the third in the series of UN Peacekeeping Operations in Haiti. It was established the 30 July 1997 for a single four-month period ending on 30 November 1997. It was established to assist the Government of Haiti by supporting and contributing to the professionalization of the Haitian National Police (HNP).
NATO Medal for Former Yugoslavia (NATO-FY)
After the peaceful conduct of the September 1996 elections, IFOR successfully completed its mission of implementing the military annexes of the General Framework Agreement for Peace. However, it was clear that much remained to be accomplished on the civil side and that the political environment would continue to be potentially unstable and insecure. On 25-26 September, one week after the Bosnian elections NATO Defence Ministers concluded that the Alliance needed to re-assess how it might continue to provide support for the establishment of a secure environment after the end of IFOR's mandate in December. The role of IFOR (Operation Joint Endeavour) was to implement the peace. The role of SFOR (Operation Joint Guard / Operation Joint Forge) is to stabilise the peace. The difference between the tasks of IFOR and SFOR is reflected in their names.

Non-Article 5 NATO Medal for Operations in the Balkans
On 14 December 1995 North Atlantic Council launched the largest military operation ever undertaken by the Alliance, Operation Joint Endeavour. Based on UN Security Council Resolution 1031, NATO was given the mandate to implement the military aspects of the Peace Agreement. A NATO-led multinational force, called the Implementation Force (IFOR), started its mission on 20 December 1995. IFOR was given a one-year mandate.
Canadian Forces Decoration (CD)
The Canadian Forces' Decoration is awarded to officers and Non-Commissioned Members of the Canadian Forces who have completed twelve years of service. The decoration is awarded to all ranks, who have a good record of conduct.

The decoration is awarded to the regular forces, reserve forces, officers of the Cadet Instructors Cadre (CIC), Canadian Rangers and holders of honorary appointments in the CF. Service in the regular and reserve or auxiliary forces of the British Commonwealth of Nations will be counted towards the medal if the final five years have been served with the Canadian Forces and no other long service, good conduct or efficiency medal has been awarded for the same service. The medal may be awarded to persons in possession of any long service, good conduct or efficiency decoration or medal clasps, provided that the individual has completed the full qualifying periods of service for each award and that no service qualifying towards one award is permitted to count towards any other. The service need not be continuous.

Service Notes: He and Cpl Eric Labbé were killed when their armoured vehicle rolled over about 40 kilometres southwest of Kandahar City in the Zhari district. Both were in the turret of a LAV-III as it made a tactical move across rugged, muddy terrain. Military spokesmen said the incident was unrelated to enemy action.
Enlisted: Valcartier, QC
Pre/Post War: Hani was remembered for his work ethic, keen leadership and jovial, generous character. Massouh was born in Alexandria, Egypt, and came to Canada when he was one-year-old. Massouh enlisted in 1990 and was a member of the now-disbanded Airborne Regiment before transferring to the Royal 22nd in 1993.

Deceased: January 06, 2008 at Nalgham Region, Afghanistan
Cemetery SAINT CHARLES Cemetery QUEBEC Quebec, Canada
Obituary: Warrant Officer, 2e Bataillon, Royal 22e Régiment (Van Doos), based in Valcartier, Québec. Aged 41, he was born in Alexandria, Egypt and grew up in Montréal. Serving with the Canadian contingent of NATO forces in Afghanistan, WO Massouh was just a few weeks away from retirement. He is survived by his wife Nathalie, young daughter Laïla, mother Pauline Nader, five brothers and sisters, and extended family. He was predeceased by his father Gawdat Massouh.
 
The medals and information on this page have not been verified by Family, Friends or historical document. To help us make this page more accurate and complete please email info@RememberNovember11.com to request any changes or to help us verify any medals or commendations.
WO Hani Massouh CD on other official websites
Canadian Virtual
War Memorial
Find A Grave
Memorial

Researched By: Sean Wilson

WO Hani Massouh CD
Printable Version
Medals and Commendations
(In Order):

Sacrifice Medal (SM)
General Campaign Star – SOUTH-WEST ASIA (GCS-SWA)
Canadian Peace Keeping Service Medal (CPSM)
UN Protection Force (Yugoslavia) (UNPROFOR)
UN Operation in Somalia (UNOSOM)
UN Mission in Haiti (UNMIH)
NATO Medal for Former Yugoslavia (NATO-FY)
Non-Article 5 NATO Medal for Operations in the Balkans
Canadian Forces' Decoration (C.D.)

Page 229 from 7th
Book of Remembrance

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Warrant Officer Hani Massouh (centre) from the 2nd Battalion, serving with the 3rd Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment (3 R22eR) Battle Group, speaks with a Afghan National Police officer